Therapeutic Parenting

IntraQuest was inspired by personal challenge, renewed hope and transformation. With this, we wholeheartedly believe happiness and fulfilment is available for everyone, regardless of what life has shown them so far!” JEN & KAREN

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Therapeutic Parenting

What is Therapeutic Parenting?

Therapeutic Parenting is a high structure/high nurture intentional parenting approach with empathy and acceptance at its core. It helps children to feel emotionally safe so that they can connect in with others and develop more secure attachment relationships.  Scientific research into the brain shows that consistently parenting in this way can help children and young people to recover from the psychological, neurological and developmental impact of early trauma.

Who is Therapeutic Parenting for?

Therapeutic parenting is especially helpful for parents and carers looking after children and young people who have experienced abuse, neglect, multiple separations and losses. Typically, these children and young people have been fostered and/or adopted. 

It can also be helpful for families who are struggling where there is no trauma history but more traditional behaviourist approaches such as reward systems and time out have failed to bring about lasting change. 

Therapeutic parenting is suitable for children and young people in one or two parent families. In two parent families, both parents are encouraged to participate as this promotes shared understanding, collaboration and consistency of approach.

What is the process in Therapeutic Parenting?

A Therapeutic Parenting intervention may comprise of 6-12 sessions of 1.5 hours in duration.

The specific length of the intervention will be informed by an initial assessment, as it is individually tailored to the needs of your child and family.

Lasting transformation is only truly likely when therapeutic parenting becomes the default pattern of relating that is embedded into everyday family life, rather than being a discrete set of strategies used in the short-term.

What happens in Therapeutic Parenting?

Parents and carers undertake an in-depth exploration of the attachment cycle and the impact of trauma on the growing child. They are encouraged to become reflective and curious to understand more fully what drives their child’s behaviour.  They develop strategies which meet their child or young person’s developmental needs rather than their chronological age for example, using Dan Hughes’ model of PACE (Playfulness, Acceptance, Curiosity and Empathy). Parents and carers are supported to establish and maintain healthy safe-care routines to reduce the risk of compassion fatigue when caring for those who have experienced trauma.

Who is Therapeutic Parenting for?

Therapeutic parenting is especially helpful for parents and carers looking after children and young people who have experienced abuse, neglect, multiple separations and losses. Typically, these children and young people have been fostered and/or adopted. 

It can also be helpful for families who are struggling where there is no trauma history but more traditional behaviourist approaches such as reward systems and time out have failed to bring about lasting change. 

Therapeutic parenting is suitable for children and young people in one or two parent families. In two parent families, both parents are encouraged to participate as this promotes shared understanding, collaboration and consistency of approach.

Limits to Confidentiality

IntraQuest promote working in collaboration with the system around the child or young person.  We therefore encourage sharing pertinent information with relevant professionals to support your child or young person’s healing journey as effectively as possible.

Therapists follow local safeguarding and child protection legislation and work in accordance with the ethical guidance provided by their professional body (for example, BACP or BAPT). This means that information will be shared with other professionals if someone is being harmed or at risk of being harmed. 

Get in touch!

If you would like to know more, or book a free consultation, please contact us or
complete our referral form.